Fan Girl Moment: Check out these earphones!

Over the weekend, I lucked out and found Yurbuds earphones on sale for nearly 75% off retail price. I had tried on these earphones, which tout being made for women and using FlexLock technology that makes their falling out during exercise nearly impossible, at a race expo last year. I’d loved how they felt, but the price tag was too steep for me. (I’m hard on headphones, and I can’t see paying more than about $20 for them.)

I couldn’t help but jump on the chance to buy these. I can’t pass up a good sale anyway. And you know what? They live up to the hype.

I wore the headphones on a run Saturday, and not once did I have to adjust them in my ears, catch them as I ran or force them deeper into my ear canal to hear the range of my music. I ran, then climbed poles and ladders, did box jumps on stone benches and such at a local playground to maintain my sense of balance. I ran suicides on the basketball course, then I ran back home. Not once did the headphones fall out or stop producing great sound.

And get this — I put in my fastest mile-split time in months. I’m not saying these headphones make me faster. But I can’t help but notice that focusing on my run without the distraction of adjusting my equipment all the time made a measurable difference in my performance.

I’m not one to recommend brand-name products all that often. But in this case, I’m offering an unsolicited, fan-girl, “go buy these things” endorsement for Yurbuds headphones. I am a convert, and I suggest you try them, too.

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Ill-advised life decision or healthiest thing I can do?

A week ago, I started the next chapter of my career. Three weeks before that, I chose to return to a life as a full-time freelance editor and writer, turning in my notice to resign from what some would call a comfortable position and choosing instead to find contract work on my own.

Don’t get me wrong: On a scale from 1 to Nightmare, my job as a Marketing manager at a nonprofit association was no slumber party on Elm Street. But it wasn’t serving me, or my health, either.

In my nine months behind that desk, I regained 25 lbs. I lost serious stamina, as evidenced by my half-hour slide in half-marathon time last winter. I slept poorly, I ate poorly. My allergies became almost as bad as they were on the East coast. I visited the doctor half a dozen times — more than I had since I took control of my health five years ago. I’d seen this decline before, and I couldn’t ignore the signs: Working in an office was killing me. Again.

So, I’ve decided to do what I must to regain my health. In my first week of not being in an office, I’ve slept better than I have since moving to the SoCal coast. I’ve eaten better, worked out more consistently and felt better overall than I could ever have expected.

Is the uncertainty stressful? Certainly. Is money a concern? Of course. But you know what? I’m ok with that uncertainty, as long as my health is certain.